Day 15 – Bursa

Today we visited the Green Mosque & Green Tomb, the Ulu Mosque, and the Silk Market (Kozahan). 

The Green Mosque was amazingly imperfect.  It was in the process of being restored and we were lucky that the Imam and the architects restoring the Mosque were eager to make our acquaintance.  The Imam spoke perfect English and was forthcoming in providing us with answers and information on all the intricacies of the mosque.  The chief architect even showed us a feature that we hadn’t seen in any of the other Mosques or buildings before.  When it was built in the 15th century, they installed rollers to ensure the building was still level and intact in the event of an Earthquake.  As long as the rollers still move, the building is fine.

The Green Mosque in Bursa, Turkey

The Green Mosque was small and quaint and the art work was purposefully done without perfection as a way to show humility below Allah (God).    The building project itself was never completed in it’s day.  However, it is referred to as the Green Mosque because the green tiles reflects light which creates a green hue within the mosque.  The Sultan that funded the project is buried in a “matching” tomb nearby. 

Inside the Green Mosque

The Green Tomb is the resting place of Celebi Sultan Mehmet I Turbesi and his 3 sons, 4 daughters, and nanny.  The tomb isn’t the resting place of his wife because back then, culturally the daughter is always buried with her father.  The coolest part about visiting the Green Tomb and Mosque was that over the course of a week and a half, I’ve really gained an appreciation for architecture and also Islamic Art.  I have a greater understanding of what the smallest details mean and even the work put into create it.  🙂

Inside the Green Tomb in Bursa, Turkey

So, when we arrived at the Ulu Mosque, I found a stark difference among others.  A lot of the Asian influence could be seen in the decor, but when the Mosque itself featured 20 domes and calligraphy with no patterns or designs except on the carpet and minbar, I was floored because there was a big difference in the status quo.  I like to believe that the reason for this was to remind worshippers at the mosque that they are there to be focused on the word over anything else.  But our Islamic Art and History professor says it’s because Calligraphy is an art of it’s own in the Muslim world. 

Ulu Mosque in Bursa, Turkey

So after admiring the art of calligraphy, we headed to the silk market.  The silk market should be renamed to the scarf market.  There were what seemed to be 30 scarf shops.  How do they stay in business with their competitors next door?  Most importantly, how would I have money to eat with walking through all of that?! 

Entering the Silk Market in Bursa, Turkey

The good news was, the silk market didn’t just feature scarves.  There were silk ties and shirts too. :-p  Ok, there were cafe shops and a pretty cool Jewelry store.  We (The MBA’s & Meredith) befriended the Jewelry shop owner because he helped translate at the shop next door in order for Brenda to buy a gift for a family member.   The owner (pictured below) even granted us an interview so we could learn more about his business.  Truly it became an incredible insight to the Jewelry & Custom furniture business even though it was all really an excuse to day dream about owning a titanic sized diamond ring before heading back to the hotel. 

Jewelry Store

When we got back to our dream world at the Kervansaray, we had spa time before the dinner with a Turkish bath.  The good news about a Turkish bath, I no longer have stretch marks.  The bad news, I’m waiting for my skin to grow back.  :-p  Kidding, it wasn’t that bad… It was a little strange at first, I felt a little violated, but after it was over, I found myself glowing and feeling refreshed.

Now, I’m going to bed feeling as if the whole day was a dream.  But at least tomorrow, I’ll still be in this waking dream where I’m still in Turkey!

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